CSBE-SCGAB

Canada is committed to reduce its GHG emissions by 17 per cent from 2005 levels by 2020. To meet this target, Canada is supporting the development of next generation technologies including biofuels. At present, Canada is supplying approximately 3% of its total energy demand from biomass but this is expected to increase to 6-10% within the next decade. British Columbia has set a GHG reduction target of 33% by 2020. CHP systems with efficiencies more than 65% can play a major role in cleaning the environment and creating jobs. UBC-BRDF is an example of modern CHP systems made by Nexterra. Nexterra is developing and marketing state-of-the-art biomass gasification technologies in Canada and the U.S.

Gasification is a common thermochemical technology used for converting feedstock such as biomass into a combustible gas mixture (syngas) by partial oxidation under high temperature condition. The syngas may be burnt directly for heating or used as a fuel for gas engines and turbines. Syngas can also be used as feedstock for the production of chemicals. In gasifiers the partial combustion of solid fuel produces combustible gases such as H2, CO, and CH4. In contract, in complete combustion of biomass CO2, O2, N2, and water are produced. In gasification biomass is continuously converted to charcoal where carbon and steam are converted to CO and H2. In addition to combustible gasses tar and dust are the side products in gasification systems.

Nearly all types of biomass can be utilized in a gasifier to generate syngas. Variations in the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of the feedstock can impact the performance of the CHP system. When biomass is used as feedstock, the feedstock’s journey starts from the sources where the “unused” woody materials are generated. The biomass is then collected at the recycling yard for temporary storage and preprocessing. In the next step, the processed feedstock is shipped to UBC-BRDF for utilization. The solid fuel is fed into the facility and it goes through several stages before it’s been used. Variations in the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of the feedstock can impact the performance of the CHP system including the tar formation.

The UBC Bioenergy Research and Demonstration Facility (UBC-BRDF) consists of a biomass gasification system (Nexterra Systems Corp., Vancouver, BC) for combined heat and power production (CHP: 2 MW electricity and 3 metric tonnes of steam per hour). The estimated annual wood fuel requirement for the system is 28,000 metric tonnes (at 50% moisture content wet mass basis). The performance and the economic viability of the system rely upon the syngas quality. 

All CSBE members will get the same rate as CSChE members for conference registration. If you would like to register for the conference (or only the Biomass and Bioenergy symposium), you can do it right now online or by downloading the PDF registration form.

Visit http://csche2012.ca for more information.

symp-vancouver

Published in Events

In March 2011, some conversation started with the Canadian Society of Canadian Chemical Engineering president at the time (Dr. Robert Legros) for some potential joint programs and collaborations between CSBE and CSChE. The 1st opportunity was identified to be the 62nd CSChE in Vancouver, October 14-17 2012. The theme of the conference (Energy, Environment and Sustainability) well suited the CSBE working area. After a number of meetings and conference calls with the CSChE executives and CSBE council, an MOU was signed between two societies (February 2012). Since then CSBE has started working very closely on the symposium program with Dr. Paul Watkinson, the chair of the International Symposium of Biomass and Bioenergy –which is being held parallel as the core conference program. Dr. Shahab Sokhansanj was assigned to be the co-chair of the symposium from CSBE. The announcement for paper submission for International Biomass and Bioenergy is prepared and sent out.

I have continued to aware all Biomass and Bioenergy Research Group (BBRG) members of CSBE, including the new graduate students. Some new membership applications are sent to CSBE and some more will be sent shortly.

Co-sponsors : Canadian Society for Bioengineering & Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering

The 62nd Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference is being held in Vancouver, BC from October 14-17 2012. One of the symposium running parallel to the main conference is the International Symposium of Biomass and Bioenergy. It’s Co-sponsored by Canadian Society for Bioengineering & Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

For conference information and abstract submission please refer to: www.csche2012.ca

  • Biomass resources, supply chain and feed-stock preparation;
  • Thermochemical conversion: torrefaction, pyrolysis, gasification** and combustion; tar formation, characterization and removal ; gas conditioning and cleaning;
  • Biological processes: algae production processes, ligno-cellulosic ethanol, higher alcohols, bio-methane;
  • Products from biomass: New products, bio-diesel, fuels and chemicals, lignin, biochar, pellets;
  • Upgrading and utilization of bio-oil and bio-fuels;
  • Research network activities;
  • Building the bio-economy: bio-pathways and the forest bio-refinery; markets, investment and financing; successes and failures.

**Abstracts primarily devoted to gasification should be submitted to i-SGA-3 which will be running concurrently.

Contacts:

Paul Watkinson, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Shahab Sokhansanj, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Franco Berruti, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Wenli Duo, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.